Combined Programs: The Yoga of Shambhala with Dana Strong & Turning the Mind into an Ally

June 30–July 6, 2008

Tuition $250 + 6 nights

The Yoga of Shambhala: Embodied Enlightenment with Dana Strong (June 30 – July 4)
In the time of the Buddha, yoga and meditation were considered inseparable practices on the path to enlightenment. Over time it seems the road has forked, and each practice has lost some of its potency without the other. Just as we train our bodies, we can train our minds. If the body feels blocked, the mind becomes anxious and heavy. Join us to discover the interconnection between yoga and meditation from the Shambhala perspective. This program will include a personal posture consultation, advice for establishing a home practice and specific yoga sequences that support a healthy meditation practice. Students at all levels of practice welcome.

Dana Strong, a student of Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, has taught yoga for 10 years under the guidance of Rodney Yee. She co-directs a yoga eacher training program in New York City. Dana is also a graduate student at Columbia University with a focus in Buddhist-Christian dialogue.

Turning the Mind into an Ally (July 4 – 6)
During this retreat, we will receive practical instructions for living in an awakened way through peaceful abiding meditation, which connects us with our mind’s inherent stability, clarity and strength. The program will also include basic grounding in the principles of meditation, as well as contemplative techniques to gain insight into the state of our mind and the state of our life.

We will draw from Turning the Mind into an Ally, the best-selling book by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche.

Many of us are slaves to our minds. Our own mind is our worst enemy. We try to focus, and our mind wanders off. We try to keep stress at bay, but anxiety keeps us awake at night. We try to be good to the people we love, but then we forget them and put ourselves first. And when we want to change our life, we dive into spiritual practice and expect quick results, only to lose focus after the honeymoon has worn off. We return to our state of bewilderment. We’re left feeling helpless and discouraged. It seems we all agree that training the body through exercise, diet, and relaxation is a good idea, but why don’t we think about training our minds?

— From Turning the Mind into an Ally by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche

Register below to receive a discount for attending both programs.

The Yoga of Shambhala: Embodied Enlightenment with Dana Strong (June 30 – July 4)
In the time of the Buddha, yoga and meditation were considered inseparable practices on the path to enlightenment. Over time it seems the road has forked, and each practice has lost some of its potency without the other. Just as we train our bodies, we can train our minds. If the body feels blocked, the mind becomes anxious and heavy. Join us to discover the interconnection between yoga and meditation from the Shambhala perspective. This program will include a personal posture consultation, advice for establishing a home practice and specific yoga sequences that support a healthy meditation practice. Students at all levels of practice welcome.

Dana Strong, a student of Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, has taught yoga for 10 years under the guidance of Rodney Yee. She co-directs a yoga eacher training program in New York City. Dana is also a graduate student at Columbia University with a focus in Buddhist-Christian dialogue.

Turning the Mind into an Ally (July 4 – 6)
During this retreat, we will receive practical instructions for living in an awakened way through peaceful abiding meditation, which connects us with our mind’s inherent stability, clarity and strength. The program will also include basic grounding in the principles of meditation, as well as contemplative techniques to gain insight into the state of our mind and the state of our life.

We will draw from Turning the Mind into an Ally, the best-selling book by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche.

Many of us are slaves to our minds. Our own mind is our worst enemy. We try to focus, and our mind wanders off. We try to keep stress at bay, but anxiety keeps us awake at night. We try to be good to the people we love, but then we forget them and put ourselves first. And when we want to change our life, we dive into spiritual practice and expect quick results, only to lose focus after the honeymoon has worn off. We return to our state of bewilderment. We’re left feeling helpless and discouraged. It seems we all agree that training the body through exercise, diet, and relaxation is a good idea, but why don’t we think about training our minds?

— From Turning the Mind into an Ally by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche

Register below to receive a discount for attending both programs.

Program Details

Financial aid is available for this program.