Limitless Ayatanas: Scorpion Seal and Werma Practice Intensive

Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown

August 11–19, 2014

Tuition $150 + 8 nights

Discovering the Sacredness of Sense Perceptions through the Werma Sadhana

“In some religious traditions, sense perceptions are regarded as problematic, because they arouse worldly desires.  However, in the Shambhala tradition, which is a secular tradition rather than a religious one, sense perceptions are regarded as sacred.  They are regarded as basically good.  They are a natural gift, a natural ability that human beings have.  They are a source of wisdom.”

         –Chogyam Trungpa, Rinpoche, from Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior

One of the most provocative teachings in the Werma Sadhana is that our ayatanas, or sense gates, are limitless.  This points to a difference from Buddhist teachings on sense perceptions, and highlights additional skillful means in our Shambhala practice.  This program introduces the profundity of these teachings through Werma practice, talks, and guided sensory exercises drawn from the Buddhist and Shambhala traditions. These practices widen our awareness of the ordinary magic of direct perception.  In this Werma program, we will explore how we might bring these practices into our daily lives as householders with relationships and livelihoods.  The vividly beautiful Shambhala Mountain Center is a perfect place for exploring these profound teachings.

Prerequisite: Werma Practitioner

 

Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown

Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown, Ph.D., is Distinguished Professor of Contemplative and Religious Studies at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, where she has taught since 1978.  As Buddhist practitioner since the early 1970’s, she became a student of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche in 1974, and was empowered as an acharya (senior teacher) by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche in 2000. Her teaching specialties are meditation practice, Shambhala teachings, Buddhist philosophy, tantric Buddhism, and contemplative higher education.  Her book, Dakini’s Warm Breath (Shambhala 2001), explores the feminine principle as it reveals itself in meditation practice and everyday life for women and men.  She has also edited Meditation and the Classroom: Contemplative Pedagogy for Religious Studies (SUNY 2011). She had her husband, Richard, have two adult children and three grandchildren.

Program Details

Financial aid is available for this program.