Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown

Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown, Ph.D., is Distinguished Professor of Contemplative and Religious Studies at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, where she has taught since 1978.  As Buddhist practitioner since the early 1970’s, she became a student of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche in 1974, and was empowered as an acharya (senior teacher) by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche in 2000. Her teaching specialties are meditation practice, Shambhala teachings, Buddhist philosophy, tantric Buddhism, and contemplative higher education.  Her book, Dakini’s Warm Breath (Shambhala 2001), explores the feminine principle as it reveals itself in meditation practice and everyday life for women and men.  She has also edited Meditation and the Classroom: Contemplative Pedagogy for Religious Studies (SUNY 2011). She had her husband, Richard, have two adult children and three grandchildren.

Upcoming Programs by Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown

Summer Seminar: Weeks I & II

Also Acharya Susan Chapman, Acharya Holly Gayley, Acharya Daniel Hessey and Gelong Loden Nyima

June 12–27, 2020

The single focus of the Buddha’s teachings was showing humanity the path to ending suffering and reconnecting with our natural state of freedom. The profundity and sophistication with which the Buddha expressed a path of liberation has given his teachings a timeless relevance, making them as practical today as ever. Over the course of this […]

Summer Seminar I: Discovering the Path of Liberation, and II: Living Wisdom and Compassion

Also Acharya Susan Chapman, Acharya Holly Gayley, Acharya Daniel Hessey and Gelong Loden Nyima

June 12–July 10, 2020

The single focus of the Buddha’s teachings was showing humanity the path to ending suffering and reconnecting with our natural state of freedom and openness. The profundity and sophistication with which the Buddha expressed a path of liberation has given his teachings a timeless relevance, making them as practical today as ever. Over the course […]

Scorpion Seal Community Retreat: Limitless Ayatanas

July 12–23, 2020

“In some religious traditions, sense perceptions are regarded as problematic, because they arouse worldly desires.  However, in the Shambhala tradition, which is a secular tradition rather than a religious one, sense perceptions are regarded as sacred.  They are regarded as basically good.  They are a natural gift, a natural ability that human beings have.  They […]